Browsing All Posts published on »August, 2011«

Serving Two Masters

August 31, 2011

0

It has been said that you cannot serve two masters, for you will hate the one and love the other or be devoted to one and despise the other. I find this true within the workplace. When individual exaltation or organizational self-promotion takes precedence over the focus on the indisputably important services of a company, it becomes increasingly more difficult to keep focused on securing the truly important from the propagating mass of politically important self-serving projects.

Conversations with an Atheist

August 30, 2011

5

It has been said that the atheist has created his own religion, where his God is called “Chance”. That may be well be true, but I have found in discussions with one of my friend (the self-proclaimed spokesman for all Atheists) that when an atheist cannot explain why they believe something, they do what they accuse Christians of doing, and appeal to Blind Faith. No, their appeal is not to a Supreme Being or divinely inspired holy text but in something we call the Scientific Method. For my friend, the Scientific Method has become his personal safety net used to explain everything. It turns out to be extremely efficient and effective for him, as he no longer has to spend the time considering all the evidence.

Have We Have Become Comfortably Numb?

August 29, 2011

0

Comfortable. The most dangerous place for people (especially the Church) to be is when we allow ourselves to become comfortable…comfortable not just in our physical living conditions but in an attitude of acceptance or resignation that the tragedies occurring around us are just normal everyday things which will never go away. We become calloused; deaf to the plight and pain of others. How else could we ever become comfortable enjoying our ‘stuff’ unless we were able to quiet the voice of conscience within us?

Scarface was Right, We are the Masters of Deflection

August 28, 2011

1

I think that most of us, especially those in the church, fear being known and knowing others. We isolate ourselves; stay home (think ostrich with its head in the ground), so we do not have to learn that our neighbors (or friends or family) are in ‘need’. It’s as if, so long as we are not consciously aware of a specific problem, we are not accountable for how we respond.

No Pain No Gain

August 27, 2011

1

Perhaps it is our lot in life to suffer. Isn’t that part of the curse? It is a truth which is easily agreed upon by most people – not based on book knowledge but upon the un-ignorable teachings of experience, equally available to all people. Yet in that experience, one might ask, ‘Where is God?’ […]

Stop Cursing the Darkness, O Reluctant Leader!

August 26, 2011

3

This is the problem with modern church culture…perhaps with modern culture altogether. We talk and expect God or Bill Gates to do something about it. We are very good at identifying needs and problems, but we are very poor at looking for answers within ourselves. We prefer to point our finger at other people and organizations and cry out because they are not doing something that God has called us to do. The real question we should be asking is; why aren’t we doing what we were called to do?

Be the Exception to the Rule

August 25, 2011

4

People in the church often err by labeling groups of people with broad strokes (e.g. liberals, democrats, homosexuals, etc.) and not spend the time to see that all people are unique individuals. There may be similarities, but just as all church attenders are not identical clones of one another, people outside of the church are not either, regardless of what group one labels them with. The reverse is also true, non-church folks tend to label church folks as all being hypocrites, illogical, insecure or hateful. If that were true, how do they account for Billy Graham, C.S. Lewis, Dietrich Bonhoeffer or Mother Theresa? Here’s the hope. When we individually as Christians engage non-Christians in a Christ-like manner, an amazing thing happens; it helps to falsify the stereotype of Christians that others may have previously held. Individuals impacted by our Christ-like actions can no longer claim (at least not honestly) or live comfortably with their previous label for “all Christians”. They are forced to broaden their prior stereotypical thinking to now include, at the very least, exceptions to the rule. They can no longer use “All Christians are…” because they now know a Christian who does not do that. It’s a two way street. As the Christian, in this case my friend, got to know this transgendered individual as a unique person with common human fears, hurts, dreams and hope – we begin to see others more and more like ourselves. Our common humanity is reinforced and mankind’s artificial “walls of separation” are broken down, if only a little bit.