Browsing All posts tagged under »Blind spots«

Sorry, Can’t Hear You over the Voice in My Head

September 1, 2011


The two most difficult things to patiently endure when discussing one’s personal beliefs with others has to do with: 1.Navigating the minefield of predisposed prejudices, assumptions and opinions that others have about your beliefs before you even have the chance to explain your position. It’s those Blind Spots that we all have. Sometimes that filter can be so strong, that they may not even be able to hear you over the voice in their own head. 2.Controlling your emotions when someone, intentionally or mistakenly, misrepresents your position. It’s the Straw man logical fallacy where you hold position X; someone disregards certain points of X and instead presents a similar position Y. Y being a distorted version of X. They then attack Y, concluding that position X is false. "A straw man is a component of an argument and is an informal fallacy based on misrepresentation of an opponent's position.[1] To "attack a straw man" is to create the illusion of having refuted a proposition by replacing it with a superficially similar yet unequivalent proposition (the "straw man"), and refuting it, without ever having actually refuted the original position." -

Be the Exception to the Rule

August 25, 2011


People in the church often err by labeling groups of people with broad strokes (e.g. liberals, democrats, homosexuals, etc.) and not spend the time to see that all people are unique individuals. There may be similarities, but just as all church attenders are not identical clones of one another, people outside of the church are not either, regardless of what group one labels them with. The reverse is also true, non-church folks tend to label church folks as all being hypocrites, illogical, insecure or hateful. If that were true, how do they account for Billy Graham, C.S. Lewis, Dietrich Bonhoeffer or Mother Theresa? Here’s the hope. When we individually as Christians engage non-Christians in a Christ-like manner, an amazing thing happens; it helps to falsify the stereotype of Christians that others may have previously held. Individuals impacted by our Christ-like actions can no longer claim (at least not honestly) or live comfortably with their previous label for “all Christians”. They are forced to broaden their prior stereotypical thinking to now include, at the very least, exceptions to the rule. They can no longer use “All Christians are…” because they now know a Christian who does not do that. It’s a two way street. As the Christian, in this case my friend, got to know this transgendered individual as a unique person with common human fears, hurts, dreams and hope – we begin to see others more and more like ourselves. Our common humanity is reinforced and mankind’s artificial “walls of separation” are broken down, if only a little bit.

Blind Spots

August 24, 2011


We all have blind spots. They are situation or issues where we are either too close emotionally to fairly evaluate or we’ve become too invested in our current position on the subject to see it objectively. We make some assessment and then write it off as done, refusing to reexamine or reconsider our view on the subject. Most people seem blissfully content to remain in this state because we do not like changing our previously written off positions; mainly because many of us see doing that as an admission of wrong; we take it as a personal loss and our egos cannot accept that. We therefore choose to stubbornly cling to outdated notions, refusing to reevaluate them against new evidences. While this may make us feel strong and confident (not to mention a bit arrogant and intolerant), we are really blinded by our own desire to be right.